Research has long proven—and continues to prove—that fruits and vegetables are staples in a healthy diet. It’s not just for weight loss, but also for avoiding disease and increasing energy. The benefits of fruits and vegetables are no secret, but it’s surprisingly hard to work them into a day’s meals, especially for people who don’t cook regularly. But it’s easier than many would have you believe. Most health departments recommend at least five servings of fruits and vegetables per day, but the average people eats only three. One problem is that many people do not know what a “portion” is, and either eat too much or too little. ...
For many, aging isn’t so much about the wrinkles and age spots—the physical signs of the passage of time—than it is about the mental deterioration that comes with getting old. Fortunately, scientists have found ways to counteract the latter, if only temporarily. Certain foods have been found to help boost brain power even in older people, and the best news is that they’re accessible and easy to incorporate in one’s diet. These ones top most doctors’ lists: Blueberries: In animal studies, blueberries have been shown to prevent oxidative stress in the brain. Simply put, this means they keep brain cells from deteriorating as a result of regular activity. This in turn ...
Acai berry has made headlines in recent years as a supposed new “wonder food”: it has been claimed to help with everything from rashes and the common cold to cancer and diabetes. What put it on the map, however, is the claim that it works miracles for weight loss. But for all that hype, why hasn’t it made it into the mainstream market? Does it really do everything it’s said to do? Here are the straight facts on acai berry to help you make your choice. Brazilians have long used acai berries, the fruit of the acai palm, to cure skin conditions. They brew acai seeds into tea to help bring ...
Protein shakes have long been associated with weight gain—athletes use them to gain muscle and body-builders attribute their unmistakable bulk to high protein intake. So it’s a little strange that companies are now peddling protein shakes for weight loss—the exact opposite of what they’re known to do. Surprisingly, there’s real science supporting this claim. So how does it work? If you’ve been reading up on weight loss, you’re probably familiar with fat and muscle densities. Fat is less dense than muscle, which means it weighs less while taking the same amount of space. So the more muscle you have, the smaller you will be while remaining in a healthy weight range. ...
Staying on track when you’re on a diet is hard—just ask anyone who’s been on a weight loss plan. The reason so many people fail is that they associate weight loss with huge amount of sacrifice. As a result, they are predisposed to dislike anything that’s part of a diet, even if it’s perfectly good food they would eat any other day. A good meal plan for weight loss includes foods you would eat even if you weren’t on a diet, but in the right amount and accompanied by other lifestyle changes. Here are some suggestions to help you get started. Breakfast: Start the day off with something light and filling. ...